Pupil Premium at Holy Cross

Holy Cross Catholic Primary School Pupil Premium Strategy Statement 2017-18

 

“I was disadvantaged as a child, yet I had the advantage of being in the company of great teachers.”

(A.P.J. Abdul Khan, 11th President of India)

 

“Every one of our children is carrying something the world is waiting for – it’s just the world hasn’t got it yet,” Sister Judith Russi

 

The ‘Pupil Premium’ is a government initiative that provides extra funding aimed at pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. Research shows that pupils from deprived backgrounds underachieve compared to their peers and that there is a strong link between eligibility for free school meals and underachievement. The Pupil Premium is designed to help each school boost the attainment of disadvantaged children and reduce the gap between the highest and the lowest achievers. The government has used pupils’ entitlement to free school meals (FSM) and children looked after by the local authority (CLA) as an indicator for deprivation. The funding is allocated according to the number of pupils on roll who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (known as ‘Ever6 FSM’), an allocation for each pupil who has been ‘Looked After’ (in care) and a smaller amount for the children of service families.

 

Principles

 

  • To ensure that teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all pupils.

  • To ensure that appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of socially disadvantaged pupils are adequately assessed and addressed.

  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged pupils, we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged.

  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are socially disadvantaged are registered for free school meals. We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil, or groups of pupils the schools have legitimately identified as being socially disadvantaged.

  • Pupil Premium funding will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify priority groups or individuals. Limited funding and resources means that not all children receiving free school meals will be in receipt of pupil premium interventions at one time.

 

 

  1. Summary information

Academic Year

2017-18

Total PP budget

50480

Date of most recent PP Review

July 2017

Total number of pupils

270

Number of pupils eligible for PP

43

Date for next internal review of this strategy

December 2017

 

 

 

FSM

Ever6

Pupil Premium Plus

(Adoption Premium)

Services

9

20

5

9

 

Current Academic Year

(Percentages are for each cohort and the totals across the school)

 

Year Group

Total

FSM

Ever 6

Services

Adoption Premium

Year 6

9

 

6

2

1

Year 5

6

1

4

 

1

Year 4

6

2

2

2

 

Year 3

3

 

2

1

 

Year 2

8

3

2

3

 

Year 1

6

2

2

1

1

Reception

5

1

2

 

2

Total

43

9

20

9

5

 

 

  1. Current achievement

End of KS1 & 2 Attainment for: 2016-2017

Pupils eligible for PP

 

Pupils not eligible for PP

School

National

% achieving expected standard or above in reading, writing and maths

67

69

61

% achieving expected standard or above in reading

67

73

71

% achieving expected standard or above in writing

67

81

76

% achieving expected standard or above in maths

89

96

75

Progress score in Reading

9

2.3

 

Progress score in Mathematics

9

5.0

 

Progress score in Writing

9

1.1

 

% achieving expected standard or above in reading at KS1

50

81

 

% achieving expected standard or above in writing at KS1

67

77

 

% achieving expected standard or above in maths at KS1

67

81

 

 

 

  1. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

  1.  

37% of PP pupils are EAL. Issues to be addressed include lack of vocabulary and difficulties with understanding.

  1.  

PP children closing that gap.

Actual result against predictions for 2016-2017 were:

 

KS1

All

PP

 

P

R

P

Reading

84

81

86

50

Writing

84

77

72

67

Maths

84

81

72

67

SPAG

84

 

 

KS2

All

PP

 

P

R

P

Reading

85

73

75

67

Writing

77

85

63

67

SPAG

85

85

66

78

Maths

85

96

75

89

The results show a gap at KS1 in all subjects, especially reading. There was also a gap at KS2 but in many subjects there, we were above our prediction.

 

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

  1.  

Attendance over 2016-2017 for the 41 Pupil Premium children was 96.69%. Whilst this was a slight decrease in last year’s 97.23%, it was above the national and school average. Individuals were highlighted …

 

Social - the school draws from a diverse range and is in an inner city location - a deprived area. Parents often have financial difficulties as well as a mindset that restricts development - not going anywhere, not valuing opportunities, not experiencing activities that enhance language development

 

Home issues - the PSA spends a considerable amount of time with PP families supporting them to support their children as well as domestic situations and problems


 

  1. Desired outcomes

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

  1.  

All staff fully aware of who our PP children are and this impacts on what is offered on both a daily and strategic level.

All TAs attend PPMs.

Barriers to learning are quickly identified and addressed.

Barriers reviewed in half termly PPMs.

PP pupils identified on planning documents

PP pupils will be targeted for timely interventions

All interventions will be recorded and impact assessed.

 

 

 

Diminishing the Difference documentation identifies the actions agreed and the impact of actions for all PP pupils.

Teachers review DtD documentation prior to each half termly PPM.

New/revised targets set for PP pupils following each PPM.

Diminishing the Difference document shows the progress of the PP children.

Targeted children will make 6+ steps progress

The gap between PP and non PP progress will decrease

Children will be able to talk about their progress and know their next step action

Progress will be evident from looking at their work.

 

Children, and boys in particular, will become more motivated and engaged with their learning, with the desired impact of raising attainment and progress

 

 

 

 

 

Children will show increased levels of engagement and motivation for their schoolwork

Digital technologies will be used in all classes to inspire and engage children with their learning.

Personalised learning resources are used to motivate children

Intervention tracking shows gaps closing

 

Children will develop their vocabulary knowledge and language skills across the curriculum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading abilities will improve and the gap between pp and non PP will decrease

Lessons will have planned vocabulary sessions

Spelling lessons and practice will take place daily in year groups

All targeted pupils will receive support from the EMAT

All targeted pupils will show improvement in their speaking skills.

 

Children will become more resilient, secure and confident

 

All targeted children will receive PEC provision

Children will show a reduction in behaviour related issues

All children will know what the learning behaviour are and have strategies to help them become more resilient and confident.

PP children will be given the opportunity to take part in extracurricular activities and visits.


 

  1. Planned expenditure

Academic year

2017/18

The headings below enable schools and the Trust to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium improve outcomes for Pupil Premium Children.     These headings are the same of all Plymouth CAST schools, but can be individualised under the Chosen action/approach column.

a. Additional Teaching Staff

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Raise attainment in reading for PP children below ARE

KR employed to work with groups 4 hours a week

Children working with this teacher

make accelerated progress

Group will be monitored by HoL and progress measures checked

Cost = £3500

DP

KR

Diminish the difference in reading for PP children

Teacher running a lunchtime reading comprehension group for PP children

 

Moderate impact for moderate cost

 

Group will be monitored by HoL and progress measures checked

Cost = £500

DP

KD

Children to make expected or better progress in Reading, Writing and Maths across the school

PP reading and writing improves in line with non-pp children at the end of KS2

 

 

Additional TA hours to support interventions and extra-curricular activities (TA provision to facilitate)

 

Teaching Assistants to provide

additional interventions to enable

greater personalised learning.  

Progress is monitored closely and

children are given timely and

precise feedback to enable them to progress. TA’s to discuss the progress with the class

teacher and amend the

interventions as needed to ensure

that these are closely matched to

the ongoing assessments.

 

Clear baseline to be recorded before the group interventions begin. Termly assessments and progress in terms of steps progress are recorded. Additional or amended interventions put in place as needed. Evaluations to be recorded and reviewed.

Interventions discussed during termly data meetings.

Cost = £13000

DP

JC

Provide specific support for SEN PP children

SENCo to work with specific groups and teachers as a result of particular highlighted needs. Pupil Premium children make up 40% of these groups.

SENCo works with groups of PP children to enhance their learning

 

Group work with the SENCo has

proved highly successful in the

past in accelerating progress

Intervention records will show the impact of the intervention

Drop ins, pupil interviews and evidence in books.

PPM data analysis

 

30% of SEN staff budget = £10000

JC

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£27000

b. 1-1 Intervention - Academic

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Accelerated progress is made as a result of specific support

Continue to support teachers in analysing the needs of their own class. These will be summarised at the end of each half term so that children who are falling behind can be quickly identified and interventions arranged.

 

Employ a supply teacher to release the class teacher to work with pupil premium children in the afternoon.

Continue to release class teachers to work with pupil premium children where needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is widely acknowledged that releasing the class teacher to work with the child improves longer term learning as it can be reinforced.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will be carefully planned following PPMs

 

Supply cover £9000

 

DP

PC

Maintain 100% pass rate for PP pupils phonic screening

RWInc phonics pinny time

Proven success in schools which use this approach

RWInc leader will monitor and feed back to SLT on half termly basis.

SH

Pupils who are both PP and EAL display increased understanding of spoken word and a wider vocabulary

1.5 days from EMAT used 1:1 with specific pupils

Pupils benefit from expertise of language specialist.

EMAT feed back half termly to SENCo/HoL on children’s progress

 

Cost = 33% of EMAT £2000

JC

Maintain 100% PP achieving GLD

TA to deliver bespoke interventions to close GLD gaps

Pupils who reach age related expectations at the end of EYFS are on track to achieve or exceed by the end of KS1, KS2 and beyond

EYFS lead to review progress at half termly PPMs. Report to SLT on termly basis. EYFS lead to present at Governors’ meeting annually

DP

Increase % PP who achieve expected standard in reading at end of KS1 to above 80%

PP pupils in years 1 and 2 to be read with additionally to normal classroom practice.

PM Benchmarking to be used three times a year to identify gaps in comprehension.

Reading incentive scheme to be introduced across KS1.

Support from ‘Right to Read’ volunteer.

Deliver twilight training for all TAs and parent volunteers with regard to supporting reading.

Past experience of PM Benchmark

has shown it to be a highly effective diagnostic tool.

Children who read regularly have higher overall attainment, higher intelligence and greater general knowledge than those that do not (Anne Cunningham: What Reading does for the mind’).

Children coming from homes with deprivation do not receive the same support with reading as other children.

Progress reviewed in PPMs

DP

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£11000

c. 1-1 Intervention - Social

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Parents more supportive and involved in their own child’s learning

We need to continue to be proactive in supporting our pupil premium parents.

Our PSA will continue to seek ways to involve parents in our school, by organising coffee mornings and courses, such as SPOKES, cooking and paired reading. PP parents will be invited individually.

When parents see themselves in partnership with the school, and feel more confident in a shared approach, the outcomes for the child are enhanced.

Moderate impact for moderate cost based on moderate evidence (EEF)

PSA timetable

RC

Specialist support able to help individual children with barriers to learning

 

Children will become more resilient, secure and confident

 

 

The Excellence Cluster, specifically through the MAST team offers support to families and individual children as required. These include a Family Support Workers, a drama therapist, a learning mentor and education psychologist.

Specialist support from learning mentors, drama-therapists and educational psychologists will continue to be available for our children.

Children are given an opportunity to talk about their emotions in a safe and secure environment. They are able to discuss any worries or concerns that they may have. They will feel more secure and resilient, increasing their confidence and sense of well-being.

 

PEC reviews and individual feedback from Mentors/counsellors/class teachers

 

 

50% of Excellence Cluster support = £5000

 

JC

Children will become more resilient, secure and confident

Extra curricular and residential activities

A percentage of the cost of the residential trips and class visits

 

 

Adventure education usually involves collaborative learning experiences with a high level of physical (and often emotional) challenge. Practical problem-solving, explicit reflection and discussion of thinking and emotion. Meta-cognition and self-regulation may also be involved.

 

Groups to be targeted to ensure participation

Pupil feedback and discussions post visits.

Case studies to measure impact on specific children

PP children subsidy for Residentials = £1000

(as well as funding from Sports Premium)

PC

TD

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£6000

d. Group Intervention - Academic

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Children understand and use a wider vocabulary

TA to lead SPOKES intervention 1 hour a week

Moderate impact for moderate cost based on extensive evidence(EEF)

Group will be monitored by HoL and progress measures checked

TC

Pupils display enhanced auditory and talking skills

TA to deliver daily BLAST 2 intervention

Moderate impact for moderate cost based on extensive evidence(EEF)

Group will be monitored by HoL and progress measures checked

Costs included in TA provision

KJ

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£0

e. Group Intervention - Social

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Children able to communicate effectively and build relationships beyond the classroom

Time to Talk – run by a TA over lunchtime

Moderate impact for moderate cost based on extensive evidence(EEF)

Group will be monitored by HoL and progress measures checked

Cost = £500

TC

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£500

f. Learning Resources

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Equip parents with resources to support their children in their learning and making the parents more confident in doing so

 

HoL to meet with PP parents to discuss their needs to support their child.

PSA to follow up three times a year

 

 

 

Resources = £1000

 

 

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£1000

g. Staff Training

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

TAs are fully equipped to support children’s reading development

Twilight training

Supporting the development of comprehension strategies is more challenging than supporting decoding.

Monitoring of 1-1 reading

DP

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£0

h. Enrichment/Raising Aspirations

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Increase opportunity and awareness for all pupils

Develop a vision for what we offer our pupils – 100 things to do before you leave Holy Cross

There are some children in our school who have such limited experiences

Vision to be understood by all

PC

DP

Capture evidence of what pupils do beyond the academic

Introduce Achievement Builder across Years 5 and 6

Online tools with a competitive edge motivate children

This can be see online

Achievement Builder = £500

 

PC

Ensure all children have access to opportunities

Continue to help fund extra-curricular activities to support raising aspirations for our PP children. A designated part of the Sports funding will pay for their activities.

 

Cost from Sports Premium

TD

Pupils contribute to City Youth Council.

Pupils’ views on issues that affect them in their school, their local community and the country as a whole represented by the Plymouth City Youth Council.

Buy into City Youth Council service to increase opportunities for pupils to engage with Active Citizenship learning.

Contributing to decision making on a local and national level increases feelings of wellbeing and aspiration.

 

DP

Increase pupils studying through Children’s University by 10% so that more pupils try new experiences, develop new interests and acquire new skills.

PSA and HoL to promote Children’s University to PP parents

Pupils need to be prepared for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life in modern Britain. Much of this learning takes place outside of the school day so Children’s University affords us the opportunity to enrich pupils’ experience beyond the classroom.

PSA/HoL report to SLT on termly basis.

PSA/HoL annual presentation at Governors’ meeting

DP/RC

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£500

i. Home Support (e.g. breakfast club, EWO etc.)

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Pupils arrive at school punctually and with time to prepare for the school day. Improved attitudes to learning. Pupils are more receptive and contribute more in class.

Subsidise Breakfast Club for PP children, especially those with lateness concerns

A healthy breakfast proven to support learning

Punctuality reviewed by EWO on a monthly basis.

Breakfast club provision monitored by Exec Head

 

Cost = £1000

PC

Parents are empowered to support their child

HoL to meet with every parent of a PP child to offer support at home through training and resources

Previous experience shows that this personal approach has engaged the parent and extended learning opportunities to the child.

Moderate impact for moderate cost based on moderate evidence (EEF)

HoL to report to Governors as part of each head’s report

DP

Reduce barriers to learning at home

PSA to target support to PP families

PSA spends over half her time working with the families of PPA children

PSA evaluations

30% of PSA staff budget = £3500

RC

Reduce barriers to learning at home

Literacy Planet subscription.

PP families are specifically invited to log on and tasks are set more frequently for PP group.

Lunch time homework club provision

Parents introduced to Literacy Planet in ‘Meet and Greet’.

Some PP pupils do not currently have access to a computer at home. They will have access to Literacy Planet at homework club.

Subscription July 2017-January 2019

£500

DP

KMcC

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£5000

j. Other, not captured by any of the above

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Homework club

Purchase laptops/tablets for access to those not able to take part in learning programmes

Some PP pupils do not currently have access to a computer at home. They will have access to Literacy Planet and Times Table Rockstars at homework club.

Drop ins

RR

KMcC

Outcomes of Mid-Year Review:

 

 

Total Planned Expenditure:

£0

 

 

  1. Additional detail

 

This strategy will be subject to ongoing monitoring throughout the year. Changes will be made dependent on the needs of individual children and cohorts as deemed necessary.

 

Some funding streams will be supported by the new PE and Sports Premium that looks wider than previously and has the vision:

‘All pupils leaving primary school physically literate and with the knowledge, skills and motivation necessary to equip them for a

healthy lifestyle and lifelong participation in physical activity and sport.’

 

                                                                                                                                                                        Total Planned expenditure £51000

Holy Cross Catholic Primary School Pupil Premium Spending 2016-2017

"A way has to be found to enable everyone to benefit from the fruits of the earth, and not simply to close the gap between the affluent and those who must be satisfied with the crumbs falling from the table, but above all to satisfy the demands of justice, fairness and respect for every human being." (Pope Francis, June 13)

"The English education system must become one in which a disadvantaged background ceases to be a barrier to a young person’s attainment and future participation in a competitive workplace." (DfES Feb 2013)

At Holy Cross, we are committed to raising attainment and closing the achievement gap by investing in best practices that mean this can be realised for all our children. We research best practice in order to ensure our disadvantaged children are able to achieve, in line with or better, than any other pupil in our school.

What are the barriers that Pupil Premium children face at Holy Cross?

The barriers to learning that disadvantaged children face are varied and complex. Disadvantaged children may not have much aspiration to learn and achieve, whilst others may not have support for learning at home, for a multitude of reasons. Some pupil premium children are also children with English as an additional language (13) so may have weaker language and communication skills as well as cultural issues. Some have special educational needs (9 SEN Support, 6 Monitoring) with low attainment on entry. Some find themselves in difficult family situations that prevent sustained progress. The following table shows the breakdown of pupil premium children this year:

We have analysed the attendance figures for the whole school and compared them to our pupil premium children and the data shows attendance is not a barrier to learning at Holy Cross. Pupil premium children at our school attend the same high percentage of school time as non-disadvantaged children.

High quality teaching is proven to be the most effective strategy for improving the needs of different groups of children. At Holy Cross, we summarise and analyse the progress of all children, particularly pupil premium children, every half term. In this way, we identify children at risk of not achieving their potential and ensure that effective interventions are put in place, regardless of whether they are at age expectations or national averages. This is then monitored to ensure any actions have a positive impact on our disadvantaged children.

Our pupil premium expenditure and actions are having a marked effect on outcomes for our disadvantaged children, with gaps in progress and attainment closing year on year. (Please refer to the table at the bottom of this document).

The following best practices have been shown to raise standards for all, so we ensure that we provide extra opportunities targeted directly at our most disadvantaged children.

What makes a difference to Pupil Premium children? What did we put in place 2015-2016

What can we do further in 2016- 2017

Effective feedback on learning

We continued to insist on quality first teaching – monitored by scrutinising feedback through books, lesson observations and pupil conversations.

We provided additional time so that teaching assistants can provide daily interventions for our pupil premium children in the afternoon to ensure their progress remains on track.

Did it make a difference?

Gaps in attainment continue to close across the school (see table below); pupil conversations show children know what they have done well and what they need to do next; book scrutinies show effective assessment for learning and the gradings of lesson observations has been 100% good or better for the last 2 terms.

This year we have begun to review our marking policy in line with the governments Marking Policy Review group to ensure that feedback is a regular and embedded feature of teaching minute to minute, hour to hour and across days and weeks.

We continue to capitalise on findings from research (Hattie 2016; Sutton Trust) to develop teaching tailored to the growth of every child: feedback is crucial for effective learning.

 Meta- cognition and self- regulation

We have continued to embed ‘learning to learn’ practices to help children ‘own’ their learning journey, which helps to increase motivation and outcomes.

The introduction of the 5 Rs (see information on our website) has given the children and teachers a shared language to talk about how learning builds.

To support self-regulation, we employed a drama therapist to work with individuals and groups of children who needed support.

Did it make a difference?

In addition to data, children talk naturally about their learning and progress as evidenced in lesson observations, and the parent and child questionnaire. Comments regarding home learning have been positive and have also supported the development of home/school partnerships.

Continue to embed and raise the importance of emotional literacy alongside practices that encourage peer and self assessment and challenge.

Work with a student to embed therapeutic play for individuals.

Purchase Thrive materials and release a Thrive trained teacher to work with individuals, groups and advise teachers on supporting others.

COST: £4574

Use these initiatives to fully support our Looked After children and families.

COST: TA all morning £8500

 Peer tutoring

This continues to be part of our drive towards High Quality Teaching. Staff training has looked at how this approach can be embedded in classroom practice and it was also made part of the quality grading guidance used to judge lesson observations and teacher performance.

Did it make a difference?

In addition to improvement in data, book scrutinies and lesson observations show that peer marking and tutoring is becoming embedded in classroom practice.

We believe giving a voice to our children develops an understanding of self-worth and value.

Observed lessons remain 100% good or better.

This will continue to be a feature of

our teaching.

CPD will enable teachers to facilitate the curriculum so that less time is spent teaching and more time is spent learning: this inevitably involves a collaborative approach with a focus on effective feedback for learning.

COST: Peer release £2000

 Early intervention

We continue to assess the children’s progress and attainment each half term and meet with the Head of Learning and SENCO teacher to ensure that children are, not only keeping up, but continuing to make progress, regardless of how much they are achieving. The staff have then worked together to ensure that effective interventions are quickly put in place.

Continue to support teachers in analysing the needs of their own class. These will be summarised at the end of each half term so that children how are falling behind can be quickly identified and interventions arranged.